Not recommended by the Stranger

A show preview by Eric Fredericksen that appeared in the February 4-10, 1999 issue of The Stranger (Seattle, WA)…

In Calling Over Time, Edith Frost and a crew of Drag City all-stars built a lovely, melancholic mood, with David (Gastr del Sol) Grubbs’ piano and organ inserting unsettling chords into low-key country arrangements.  But on Telescopic, Frost’s new Drag City release, a new cast of musicians gave her an almost prog-rock backing, while her vocals, so clear and cold on the first LP, are multi-tracked, burying their distinctive tone under studio frippery.  Looks like she’s building a career along the lines set out by labelmate Will Oldham, whose successive albums and tours are perversely inconsistent, marked by changing sidemen and changing arrangements for no clear purpose other than change itself.  Which is to say, who knows which Edith Frost will appear at this show?  She’s playing with Lullaby for the Working Class and Jana McCall, who went a bit Pink Floyd-y herself on her Up Records debut, so we could be in for the wrong kind of retro-’70s night.

Sat Feb 6 at the Breakroom.

Westword interview

An interview by Amy Kiser that appeared in Westword (Denver, CO)…

Below Freezing
Edith Frost creates music that fits the season perfectly.

Chicago-based singer-songwriter Edith Frost designs corporate Web pages by day, and on her personal site (accessible at edithfrost.com), her expertise shows. A carefully organized guide to Frost’s discography, tour dates and press bites, the destination includes a gazillion links to locales ranging from the Schwa Corporation to the Stick Figure Death Theatre. Such connections are grouped into utilitarian rubrics such as “Timewasters,” a category that includes the subheadings "Artiness" and "Weirdness."

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Bottom of the Hill (San Francisco, CA)

Played at the Bottom of the Hill with Lullaby For The Working Class and A Night Of Serious Drinking

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion), Ted Stevens (harmonica)

Willamette Week review

A review by Liz Brown that appeared in Willamette Week (Portland, OR)…

One listen to Edith Frost’s latest album, Telescopic (Drag City), makes it obvious why the label turned a demo she sent them in 1994 into an EP almost immediately.  Despite her affiliation with one of the hippest indie labels, Frost lacks pretension.  Like labelmate Will Oldham, Frost draws on traditions of country and folk, incorporating them into her own quirky style to great effect.  Frost’s recorded vocals are more akin to a smoother Liz Phair than to Billie Holiday, with whom she has been compared.  Perhaps it’s due to the electric (and often ethereal) approach on her albums, thanks in part to recording help from Chicago contemporaries Jim O’Rourke and David Grubbs of Gastr del Sol and Tsunami’s Amy Domingues.  The live version is more sparse.  Frost conveys beauty and genuine longing in heartfelt — but never clichéd — tunes with surprising ease.  Lucky for us, she’s finally touring out West.

Tunnel to bridge

photo by Edith FrostThe tunnel leading up to the Bay Bridge going into San Francisco, CA

Motley Coffeehouse (Claremont, CA)

Played at the Motley Coffeehouse (Scripps College) with Lullaby For The Working Class

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion), Ted Stevens (harmonica)

The Casbah (San Diego, CA)

Played at the Casbah with Lullaby For The Working Class and Pinback

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion), Ted Stevens (harmonica)

CMJ New Music Monthly

CMJ New Music Monthly©1999 CMJ New Music Monthly

A compilation CD included in the February 1999 issue of CMJ New Music Monthly. My song "Are You Sure?" (the same version that appeared on my second album Telescopic) was included, along with tracks by Ani DiFranco, Hope Blister, Boo Radleys, Seaweed, John Coltrane, Kodo, Starseeds, Mojave 3, P.J. Olsson, John Southworth, Lambchop, Matt Pond PA, Of Montreal, Skinnerbox, Hellacopters, Two Dollar Guitar, Black Tape For A Blue Girl, Amp, and DJ QBert.

The Onion interview

An interview by Jeff Stratton that appeared in the February 1999 issue of The Onion (Denver edition, Vol. 35 #4)

Edith Frost: Getting Warmer

"I’ve been saying it from day one and I’m still saying it: I just don’t want to ever have anything to do with the big corporate music scene."

Edith Frost is an unusual, low-key neo-folk artist known for stark, chilly songs that possess an honesty and directness which somehow makes their aloofness endearing.  A bare-bones, self-titled EP from 1996 introduced Frost’s unique talents, and her full-length followup, 1997′s Calling Over Time, featured such guests as Sean O’Hagan from the High Llamas, as well as an almost Nick Drake-like melancholy.  The new, country-tinged Telescopic is more musically lush and slightly more upbeat, albeit with Frost’s trademark poor-me lyrics.  Frost recently spoke to The Onion about depression, Jewel, high school, and her cat.

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Dylan in LA

photo by Edith FrostDylan Metrano of the band Tiger Saw

Spaceland (Los Angeles, CA)

Played at Spaceland with Lullaby For The Working Class and King Radio

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion), Ted Stevens (harmonica)

Club Congress (Tucson, AZ)

Played at Club Congress (inside the Hotel Congress) with Vic Chesnutt and Lullaby For The Working Class

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion), Ted Stevens (harmonica)

Entertainment Today review

A review by Michael Jolly that appeared in Entertainment Today (Los Angeles, CA)…

With her forbidding, Victorian-sounding name and haunting songs, it’s tempting to romanticize Drag City songstress Edith Frost as some sort of distant, enigmatic poet; yet a visit to her homemade webpage reveals a warm, disarming person who really wants to share her songs with the public. Regardless of her ersonality, she continues to weave an enchanting musical tapestry with her latest album, Telescopic.

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Stinkweed’s (Tempe, AZ)

An instore performance with Lullaby For The Working Class

My band: Ryan Hembrey (bass, guitar), Jason Adasiewicz (drums, glockenspiel), Mike Mogis (pedal steel), Shane Aspegren (percussion)

Albuquerque, NM

photo by Edith FrostMembers of Lullaby for the Working Class getting ready for bed at Hazeldine’s practice space in Albuquerque, NM.  L-R: Tiffany Kowalski, Ted Stevens, AJ Mogis, Shane Aspegren.


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