Archive for the tag "washington"

Big cedar stump

Big cedar stumpRyan Hembrey at a rest area north of Seattle


More Seattle pics

Robbie LloydRob Lloyd of the Guitar Defamation League in his SUV, blasting Lanterna as he drives me and Ryan back from breakfast in Seattle.


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Tractor Tavern (Seattle, WA)

With the Zincs and Transmissionary Six

At the Tractor Tavern
5213 Ballard Ave. NW, Seattle WA 98107
(206) 789-3599

My band: Nathaniel Braddock (guitar); Ryan Hembrey (bass); Jason Toth (drums)

Seattle traffic

Seattle trafficTrying to get off the frickin’ highway to get to our gig at the Tractor Tavern in Seattle


Graceland (Seattle, WA)

Me, Sarah Dougher, Manishevitz and Graham Travis @ Graceland
109 Eastlake Ave, Seattle, WA 98109
9p Doors, 10p Showtime, $10

Press: Bellingham HeraldThe Stranger

Bellingham Herald show preview

A preview of the Seattle show by Tony Stasiek that appeared in the Bellingham Herald

Not knowing Edith Frost personally, it’s unclear what forces propelled her to trip out the loveably icy roots tinglings of her “Calling Over Time” CD into the mushy, psychedelic fuzz on her subsequent follow-ups. Thankfully, the Chicagoan has returned to form, releasing her trebly, bare-bones early demos as “Demos,” a CD available for full download at www.comfortstand.com. Hear them in person with Manishevitz, Sarah Dougher and Graham Travis at 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4, at Graceland, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., (206) 262-0482.

Seattle show preview

A show preview by Nate Lippens that appeared in the April 11-17, 2002 (Vol. 11 No. 30) issue of The Stranger (Seattle, WA). Parts of the text seems to be recycled from his review of Wonder Wonder which appeared in the 8/9/01 issue.

Wednesday 4/17
Edith Frost, Carissa’s Wierd, Central Falls

(Graceland) Edith Frost’s debut, Calling Over Time, showcased her cool, clear take on Americana shaded with minor-key melodies reminiscent of an earthier mid-’70s Joni Mitchell. Its follow-up, Telescopic, was an atmospheric affair that displayed a bleary, introverted psychedelia similar to Syd Barrett and Skip Spence. With Wonder Wonder, Frost finds the balancing act between the sounds of those albums, more in league with her 1999 single Love Is Real. The dozen songs are subtly powerful, implying emotional depth rather than spelling it out. In person, Frost’s gossamer voice retains its otherworldliness; it’s alt-country from an alternate universe. She creates her own atmosphere with a sonic palette of skeletal arrangements that are the perfect bed for torchy balladeering.

Tablet (Seattle) preview

A show preview by Steven Seighman which appeared in the April 4, 2002 issue of Tablet Newspaper, a Seattle biweekly.

Edith Frost, with Central Falls
Wednesday, April 17 at Graceland, 8pm, 21+

The weather outside is becoming warmer, and the flowers will soon be blooming. Ah, spring, a time for frolicking, and being light and listening to happy music. One show that will definitely have heavy Springtime vibes will be Edith Frost at Graceland on April 17. Frost has that sort of indy-rock meets country feel, like Aimee Mann or even Kristen Hirsh. She is touring in support of her third album, Wonder Wonder, a record that was engineered by Steve Albini, and has been called "ambitious" and "strong" by critics. The songs from this album, along with many from her previous three, should make for a night of fun and springtime giddiness. Opening for Edith will be Central Falls, another band from Chicago, who have been described as "Acetone with twang." This show is the perfect event for this time of year, so dance around the puddles as you head on down to Graceland and get your life set for Spring!

Mentioned in The Stranger

One of my songs made an appearance in a playlist / article by Sean Nelson which appeared in the December 6-12, 2001 issue of The Stranger (Seattle, WA). The list is called LIFE DURING WARTIME: Mix Tape for a Season in Hell.

"Calling over Time," Edith Frost (Calling Over Time):
"Now you are in paradise…." This haunting campfire lament sounds eerily like a suicide bomber’s widow testifying to faith against hope. "Loving hand turns burning sand to water."

The Stranger review

A review by Nate Lippens which appeared in the August 9-15, 2001 issue (Vol. 10 No. 47) of The Stranger (Seattle, WA)…

EDITH FROST: Wonder Wonder (Drag City) ***
Since departing American-trad territory as a member of the Holler Sisters and Edith and Her Roadhouse Romeos, Chicago transplant Edith Frost has explored moody, contemplative songs with whispery aplomb. Her debut, Calling Over Time, showcased her cool, clear, dulcet-voiced take on Americana shaded with minor-key melodies reminiscent of an earthier early-’70s Joni Mitchell. Its follow-up, Telescopic, was an atmospheric affair that displayed a bleary-eyed, introverted psychedelia similar to Syd Barrett and Skip Spence. With Wonder Wonder, Frost finds the balancing act between the sounds of those albums, more in league with her 1999 single Love Is Real. The dozen songs are subtly powerful, implying emotional depth rather than spelling it out. By the finale, "You’re Decided," the strange hypnosis of the album has opened up matrices of memory and emotion, offering dusky refuge from troubling loves and losses in the lilt of Frost’s voice.

Not recommended by the Stranger

A show preview by Eric Fredericksen that appeared in the February 4-10, 1999 issue of The Stranger (Seattle, WA)…

In Calling Over Time, Edith Frost and a crew of Drag City all-stars built a lovely, melancholic mood, with David (Gastr del Sol) Grubbs’ piano and organ inserting unsettling chords into low-key country arrangements.  But on Telescopic, Frost’s new Drag City release, a new cast of musicians gave her an almost prog-rock backing, while her vocals, so clear and cold on the first LP, are multi-tracked, burying their distinctive tone under studio frippery.  Looks like she’s building a career along the lines set out by labelmate Will Oldham, whose successive albums and tours are perversely inconsistent, marked by changing sidemen and changing arrangements for no clear purpose other than change itself.  Which is to say, who knows which Edith Frost will appear at this show?  She’s playing with Lullaby for the Working Class and Jana McCall, who went a bit Pink Floyd-y herself on her Up Records debut, so we could be in for the wrong kind of retro-’70s night.

Sat Feb 6 at the Breakroom.

Washington City Paper review

A review by John Dugan that appeared in the Washington City Paper (Washington, D.C.) at some point in 1998…

Calling Over Time begins, "I sing the blues most every night, and I wait for the one I lost," and ends with "Albany Blues," where the singer subtly mentions that she might be the one to bail out if things don’t get better. In similar manner, Edith Frost drops hints about what she’s updating; in a bluesy way, she’s fashioning something divine out of the raw material of sorrow, betrayal, and confusion.

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